Tag Archives: gabriel ba

Prejudged! 03.09.10

We’re back for another slam-bangin’ edition of Prejudged!, where we judge the books by their cover. This is looking to be a pretty light week in comic books with mostly mid-level titles and a clear absence of anything related to Blackest Night or Siege, although there are a few familiar titles coming out, including new issues of Batman and Robin, Ultimate Spider-Man, and Daytripper. For a more comprehensive look at this week’s comic book releases, you can go here.

First off, is the cover to Batman and Robin #10 by Frank Quitely:

It looks like Damian’s finally had enough of playing second string to Dick Grayson’s smiling Batman and is taking matters into his own hands… with a fucking Claymore. In Grant Morrison’s new story arc, aptly named “Batman vs. Robin”, we see the dynamic between this duo turn violent when Damian decides to claim the mantle he believes is rightfully his.

This should make for very interesting comic book storytelling from Morrison, backed-up this time by Andy Clarke’s pencils. If you’d been turned away from this series by the let-down that was Philip Tan’s art, now would be the perfect time to pick it back up. The spectacular Frank Quitely covers alone should be reason enough.

Next up is the cover to Ultimate Comics Spider-Man #8 by Takeshi Miyazawa:

Last issue saw the beginnings of new super powered being in the Ultimate Marvel Universe, and from the looks of things, he has a big part to play out. Although it isn’t yet clear what exactly Rick Jones can do (aside from being able to teleport Spidey all the way to Ann Arbor, Michigan), we know this: he’s not a mutant and that a floating eyeball (the Ultimate Watcher) gave him his powers. That’s as far as we can call at this point. But then, the real grab of this story arc will be the interaction between Spidey, Torch, Iceman, and Rick Jones, and the misadventures of the rest of the Parker Household. Ultimate Spider-Man is still by far my favorite title that Bendis does, and Miyazawa is doing a decent job filling in for regular series artist David Lafuente. This title is still a lot of fun and a definite must-read.

Finally, we have the cover to Daytripper #4 by Gabriel Ba:

This series so far has been brilliant in its execution; from the achingly honest storytelling to the powerfully breathtaking artwork. Every word and every panel feels like it’s bursting with so much emotion, taking its readers through the everyday life (and deaths) of obituary writer, Brás de Oliva Domingos.

In this issue we witness the birth of Brás’ son along with everything that such an event can bring about. This should also bring out some unresolved issues between Brás’ and his own father. Daytripper is a resonating and captivating look at the different passions we all have in life from love, death, family, relationships, and every else in between. This series should one day be recognized as a modern day literary masterpiece and is a joy to read.

That’s all the time we have for this week’s Prejudged! Check back again next week to get your regular dose of Prejudged! comic books.  Have a good one, folks!

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Cover of the Week – Feb 4, ’10 releases

Cover of the Week is my presentation of the best cover from last week’s comic book releases, based on the art, design, and overall good looks.

Hello everyone! I hope you didn’t miss me that much.  This week we feature a book by the “wonder twins”, Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba.

Daytripper #2

Okay, this cover looks just how the book’s title says it is — trippy.  So here, on the top part of the cover, we see a guy who’s swimming underwater then as we go down it gently blends into two guys looking at the sky, which is really a guy underwater with dudes looking at him from a desert cliff.  What?  Exactly!  The composition of this book is very well done, light blue/white tones on the upper part which highlights and focuses our title, then it slowly transitions into dark waters/cloudy horizon in the middle, then back into a sunlit effect on a cliff at the bottom.  And I like how the use of watercolors and pens give a soft and sharp contrasting look to it. The cover also gives us a small peek as to what happens in the book.  And I must say that you need to read this issue to fully appreciate the cover (the story is amazing).    — Alex

Prejudged! 01.12.10

Welcome to another installment of Prejudged!, the only place where you can find a douchebag reviewing comic books before he has the chance to read them. This week features a new issue of Matt Fraction’s Eisner Award winning series, The Invincible Iron Man, Geoff Johns’ and Francis Manapul’s last issue of Adventure Comics, a preview issue of Alan Moore’s new horror series, the Neonomicon Hornbook, and the second issue of Daytripper by Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon. For a look at a complete list of this week’s releases, you can visit the always reliable iFanboy.com Comics page. Now, on with the judging.

First we have the cover to Adventure Comics #6 by Francis Manapul

Francis Manapul, God love him, knows how to create eye-catching covers. At first glance, you feel an immediate sense of danger, what with the image of a T-Rex’s gaping jaws and the always tricky use of a wordballoon on a cover. The direness of the situation is, although, balanced with the vibrant colors and Krypto’s playful smile, which is characteristic of how this series has been so far (excluding the last two Superboy Prime issues). This is apparently the final issue for Johns and Manapul on the main feature (they might still work on a Superboy second feature) and also the end of the first story arc about Superboy’s life in Smallville after his resurrection. Here, I assume that Conner Kent finally gains the sense of identity he’s been searching for and finds his place in Smallville and in the greater DC universe. I’m guessing that he realizes that being a hybrid clone of both Superman and Lex Luthor doesn’t mean that he has to model his life based on either and that he has his own path in life and his own destiny to fulfill. This has been one of my favorite stories of 2009 and you can expect it to be bittersweet whichever way the story ends. I will always remember this arc as one of the most endearing and most beautifully drawn stories I’ve ever read.

Next, we have the cover to Daytripper #2 by Gabriel Ba

Going through the solicitations for this week’s titles, I, immediately, was drawn to this cover. I always found that a clever use of whites greatly helps a comic book cover stand out in contrast to all the blacks that most other titles have on theirs. I also really appreciate how the dreamscape-like imagery on this cover already gives us a good idea of where the story is headed after last issue’s surprise ending. To a certain degree, the cover could even be setting the tone for the entire series. Personally, I can’t help feeling like I’ve stumbled upon something great in Daytripper. It’s a fantastic new title with amazing artwork and what feels like the beginnings of a powerful story. I highly recommend picking this book up to anyone, be you comic book fan or not.

And now, the cover to Invincible Iron Man #22 by Rian Hughes and Salvador Larroca

Nothing else on the stands even remotely comes close to the recent covers of Invincible Iron Man. That fact alone would be enough reason to pick this issue up. But then we also have Matt Fraction at his best, weaving a tale of how a broken man is able to bring together former allies. It strikes me how Captain America and Thor, seemingly without the slightest hint of hesitation, come to Tony Stark’s aid, despite everything that’s happened since Avengers Disassembled. Remember that these are three people who have had the biggest falling-out in comics history, even to the point of almost killing each other, and here they are ready to lend a hand (or hammer) (or shield) when one of them is in great need. It goes to show how certain bonds are too strong for any sort of ideology to break.

In what a lot of people would call a “light week” in comics is actually a week of special reunions, sad goodbyes,and sweet Hellos. I’d say that’s pretty heavy stuff.